Image of a creek, cropped version, showing sunlight reflections. Photo by Eduardo Libby

A lesson from the field… well, two actually

Yesterday I decided I had to go hiking after a fairly intensive working week. Of course for a photographer hiking means “shooting outdoors with half a mile walk between shots” so I just took along my camera with a normal zoom lens and went to the nearby mountains.

I did some forest photos which are nice and then came upon a small creek. I tried doing a photo of the water and the surrounding trees but the harsh sunlight just didn’t make the picture work. Then, as I was preparing to go on I noticed that the hard light produced nice reflections on the water. I zoomed in as far as I could with my zoom lens and took a picture isolating the reflections. I finished my hike and returned home.

Today, I paid more notice to my water photo and noticed how the image on the computer screen had a strong texture that reminded me of textured metal as in a sculpture shining in the sun. There was very little color so I decided it would look good as a black and white image.

Image of a creek showing sunlight reflections. Photo by Eduardo Libby
Try to see this in a larger monitor if you can! The reflections in the moving water are frozen in with a high shutter speed. Click to enlarge please!
Image of a creek, cropped version, showing sunlight reflections. Photo by Eduardo Libby
A crop of the lower part of the image showing the reflections in the water. Click to enlarge please!
Image of a creek showing sunlight reflections. Photo by Eduardo Libby
Another crop showing the reflections in the water. Click to enlarge please!

As I zoomed into the image the patterns and textures became even stronger and I learned my first lesson: size matters! The beautiful undulations of the water made visible by the reflections of the surroundings became stronger graphic elements when seen up close. If I print this photo I will surely make it really big so people can dive into the texture, or crop it even more (good thing we have so many megapixels these days).

What then is my second lesson? Always throw in a longer zoom lens if there is space in my camera bag!

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s