Tag Archives: Landscape photography

A lesson from the field… well, two actually

Yesterday I decided I had to go hiking after a fairly intensive working week. Of course for a photographer hiking means “shooting outdoors with half a mile walk between shots” Continue reading A lesson from the field… well, two actually

Peru’s Palomino Islands

I live in Costa Rica and I always wanted to see the huge seabird and seal colonies from either North or South America. When I went to Peru of course I had to visit the famous Guano Islands that were so important for harvesting bird droppings to make fertiliser and saltpetre. There are still huge guano deposits from the enormous seabird colonies that live there. Continue reading Peru’s Palomino Islands

High Pass Over the Nazca Lines

One of the highlights of a trip to Peru is a flight over the Nazca Lines: Take a double dose of motion sickness pills, jump on a tiny airplane and enjoy the view… or camera in hand shoot as much as possible during the 40 minutes flight. Continue reading High Pass Over the Nazca Lines

What is Spring like in the tropics?

A lot of people are about to enjoy, and with good reason, the Spring in the Northern Hemisphere. I live in tropical Costa Rica where the weather is practically the same year-round but we also have many plants that only bloom now and I thought I would share with you some photos of our Tropical Spring. Continue reading What is Spring like in the tropics?

Frame and wait!

Sometimes, when we find a beautiful setting, we take our camera, compose the picture and eagerly shoot a photo. We then check the LCD’s preview and see that the photo looks fine but there is something important missing from the image. It could be a balancing feature or a pattern-breaking element. Many times what the photo needs is a human or dynamic connection and if we cannot find it we walk away with an incomplete image. Continue reading Frame and wait!

How sharp do our photos need to be?

One of the coolest things I learned when I got started with photography was the use of the depth of field scales that came engraved in my lenses. With these I was able to take a picture in which both a friend and the trees in the background looked sharp. Continue reading How sharp do our photos need to be?